Image Optimization for SEO

A lot of people don’t realize how much images play into the importance of SEO in general. It is well known that Google prefers pages with rich media. Meaning, it will generally prefer a website with lots of images, videos, PDFs, etc than one that is just plain text.

But it’s not as simple as just throwing a few images into your website. Like text and HTML, images must also be optimized for search engines as well. A few key pointers to get started:

If your website is very image heavy such as a gallery or photography website, you might want to consider using an image sitemap, similar to an XML sitemap to help organize your image hierarchy a little better.

When it comes to the size of your image, there are a few quick tips to make your image as small as possible. Always save your image as the smallest resolution possible. For instance let’s say you are only displaying a small thumbnail on your website that is 200x200px, don’t upload it as 4000x4000px and shrink it on your website.

Image alt and description tags

The image alt and description tag is an attribute that you can, and should add to all image tags.

Do you know the real reason why image alt tags exist? If your image for some reason cannot be displayed your web browser will instead display the alternative text or “alt” tag. Another reason to use image alt tags is it helps you rank better in Google Image Search. When the Google Image crawler visits your site, since it can’t read most types of image it will attempt to grab meta data and other text around the image.

seo image optimization on page

Another reason you should use alt tags in your images is if you are using your image as a link anchor, the alt tag will act similarly to an anchor text for a link. Google doesn’t recommend using too many image links within a page, but this is still good to know. As for image metadata, it may not be a huge factor in SEO, but it has been shown in the past to help. At the very least, make sure your images are properly named.

Image size in SEO

If you are using Photoshop, try not to save your image in the highest quality possible. You can cut down on precious kilobytes by sacrificing a small bit of quality. There are also tools such as TinyPNG that will shrink your images down considerably.

A recent example of this would be the images contained within this guide. Many of them started out as 100kb, they were saved as 50kb then further optimized using TinyPNG and our own server bringing it down to 15kb or less. That is over a 75% reduction in size! Imagine how fast websites would be if everyone did this.

You can easily change the load time of a website from 5 seconds to 2 seconds by optimizing the images.

Image Organization

Another less commonly known but equally important aspect of on-page image optimization is image organization. Modern website frameworks such as eCommerce and Shopify organize image in specialized directories separated by date. If you aren’t using one of these frameworks then its probably a good idea to find a way to organize your images on your server. Don’t make Google crawl all over your website, do the hard part for them.

SEO image organization

If you aren’t feeling creative, at the very least create a folder called “images” and use that to store all of your images. I personally recommend

If you are interested in a nifty infographic on image optimization for SEO, this is one that we refer anyone who is new to SEO and is looking to learn more about image optimization.

Image Structured Data

If you really want to pay attention to detail, add structured data to your images. This is particularly important if you have a copyrighted image that you are looking to protect and rank for. Here is an example snippet:

<div itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/ImageObject">
<h2 itemprop="name">Photo of Something</h2>
<img src="mexico-beach.jpg" itemprop="contentUrl" />
By <span itemprop="author">Patrick Coombe</span>
Photographed in
<span itemprop="contentLocation">Delray Beach, FL</span>
Date uploaded:
<meta itemprop="datePublished" content="2008-01-25">Jan 25, 2015
<span itemprop="description">I took this picture while I was out for a stroll</span>
<div itemprop="exifData" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PropertyValue">
<meta itemprop="name" content="Exposure Time">
<meta itemprop="value" content="1/500 sec.">
</div>
<div itemprop="exifData" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PropertyValue">
<meta itemprop="name" content="FNumber">
<meta itemprop="value" content="f/3.0">
</div>
<div itemprop="exifData" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PropertyValue">
<meta itemprop="name" content="MaxApertureValue">
<meta itemprop="value" content="2.00">
</div>
<div itemprop="exifData" itemscope itemtype="http://schema.org/PropertyValue">
<meta itemprop="name" content="Flash">
<meta itemprop="value" content="Flash Off.">
</div>
</div>

As you can see, this is quite a lot of code for one image so you may want to consider this before doing it. If you’d like to learn more about schema markup and structured data and SEO, we’ve written an entire section on it.

Which image format?

When saving an image in Photoshop or even Paint, it is important to know which file format to save it in.

JPEG’s are great for photos, still image, complex coloring and lots of shading. PNG’s overall are great for graphics such as logos, very small icons, and web graphics with very few colors. GIF’s obviously are great for animated GIF’s but can also be used for smaller icons and web graphics as well.

Play with your image formats and see how large they are when you save them.  In this example, this photo of my brother saved in Photoshop as a JPEG is 200kb (at the highest setting). Save the exact same photo as a PNG and it is more than double the size.

image size tom coombe

Ranking in Google Images

Follow the steps above and you’ll be well on your way to ranking in Google Images. But just remember, just because you can rank somewhere doesn’t mean you should, especially Google Images. A lot of times Google Images will bring in a ton of traffic but really bad statistics such as a high bounce rate, low time on site and more.

This should go without saying, but stay away from stock images and always use unique images. Don’t think you can grab a stock image, change it a little and Google won’t know, because they will. They know every trick you can think of before you even think of it. Although using stock images won’t hurt you in the rankings, they probably won’t help you that much either.

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